Triad StageNationally Recognized. Locally Produced.

The Sunset Limited

A Modern Drama

At The Pyrle Theater - Greensboro

About

The Sunset Limited

 by Cormac McCarthy
directed by Preston Lane

February 13 – March 6, 2011

Life matters.
An African-American ex-con saves the life of a white professor on a subway platform in New York City, even though the professor didn’t wish for such deliverance. The incident leads the two men back to a Harlem apartment where hope and despair clash in a battle that shakes both men to the core of their existence. Is one an angel? Is the other completely lost? Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist McCarthy’s fierce and passionate writing explodes in this drama of two lives changed forever by an act of grace.

 

Showtimes

2011
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
Sun, Feb 137:30pm
Feb 14
Tue, Feb 157:30pm
Wed, Feb 167:30pm
Thu, Feb 177:30pm
Fri, Feb 187:30pm
Sat, Feb 197:30pm
Sun, Feb 207:30pm
Feb 21
Tue, Feb 227:30pm
Wed, Feb 237:30pm
Thu, Feb 247:30pm
Fri, Feb 257:30pm
Sat, Feb 267:30pm
Sun, Feb 277:30pm
Feb 28
Tue, Mar 17:30pm
Wed, Mar 27:30pm
Thu, Mar 37:30pm
Fri, Mar 47:30pm
Sat, Mar 57:30pm
Sun, Mar 67:30pm
Mar 7
Mar 8
Mar 9
Mar 10
Mar 11
Mar 12

News & Reviews The Sunset Limited

Reviews:

Taking the Last Train at Triad Stage
Classical Voice of North Carolina
February 23, 2011

The challenge in a minimalist play is to give a feeling of richness and depth, even though there might be few characters and relatively little scenic or costume design.

To stage such a production takes faith in cast, crew and audience, and Preston Lane takes that leap once again in The Sunset Limited, a one-act, one-scene play by Cormac McCarthy, and the fourth show in Triad Stage' s 10th season.

Read the review

Reviews:

Who wins in a battle of hope and despair?
Yes! Weekly
February 23, 2011

As a play driven by dialogue rather than action, The Sunset Limited lives up to creator Cormac McCarthy’s description of “a novel in dramatic form.” And no dialogue is more dramatic than his characters’ discussion of life and death, and ultimately hope and despair.

Read the review