Triad StageNationally Recognized. Locally Produced.

Arms and the Man

All’s fair in love and war.

At The Pyrle Theater - Greensboro

About

Arms and the Man

By George Bernard Shaw

All’s fair in love and war as a classic romantic triangle spins out of control in the heart of Bulgaria. Somewhere far from anywhere, a young woman obsessed with romance novels longs for adventure, while just outside of town her fiancé is the hero of a raging war. But when the battle crashes through her bedroom window in the form of a retreating enemy soldier taking refuge under her bed, everything heroic gets turned upside down. In no time at all, her boudoir becomes a battlefield for two rival suitors. Be swept off your feet by the dazzling wit of one of George Bernard Shaw’s most beloved comedies. 

Part of ArtsGreensboro's 17DAYS Arts & Culture Festival and UNCG's War & Peace Imagined series.

View Playbill

“I think Triad Stage does phenomenal, world-class work, and we are so happy to have been season subscribers over the many years (I've said this before, but I'm a native New Yorker, who's attended years worth of Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and other Fringe/Experimental theater... and I'd hold up TS work to anything I've seen in NYC for its sheer creativity and originality). I am always blow away by the creativity and variety -- especially with Preston's originals and adaptations, which run a huge range of genres and always provoke thought and conversation (my husband and I perpetually wish we could peek inside his wildly creative brain, that never seems to run out of new ways to present, interpret and create live theater that never dissapoints... lunch, sometime...lol?). I thought that the modernization of this story made it accessible in ways I didn't expect, and I actually learned something about attitudes re: pre-modern war, among other things (hygiene, anyone?). In particular, the actor who played the father/Paul, was exceptional, and as my husband & I discussed on the ride home: he does SO MUCH, with so little, stealing almost every scene in which he appeared, regardless of the number of lines he had. As a whole, TS keeps casting their actors with an uncanny skill for matching up people in roles they seemed meant to play, and we thoroughly enjoy seeing your talent appear in different TS performances, as it deepens our appreciation of their gifts (e.g. the Mother whom we most recently saw in Radiunt Abundunt...wow... another great talent!). Thank you thank you thank you for giving us so much to look forward to every season! ”

Showtimes

2016
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
Sun, Sep 117:30pm
Sep 12
Tue, Sep 137:30pm
Wed, Sep 147:30pm
Thu, Sep 157:30pm
Fri, Sep 168:00pm
Sat, Sep 178:00pm
Sun, Sep 182:00pm7:30pm
Sep 19
Tue, Sep 207:30pm
Wed, Sep 217:30pm
Thu, Sep 227:30pm
Fri, Sep 238:00pm
Sat, Sep 248:00pm
Sun, Sep 252:00pm7:30pm
Sep 26
Tue, Sep 277:30pm
Wed, Sep 2810:30am7:30pm
Thu, Sep 297:30pm
Fri, Sep 308:00pm
Sat, Oct 18:00pm
Sun, Oct 22:00pm
Oct 3
Oct 4
Oct 5
Oct 6
Oct 7
Oct 8

Cast

Petkoff
Mark Boyett
Louka
Caity Brewer
Raina
Blair Busbee
Sergius
Donovan Wayne Christie Jr
Russian Officer
Daniel Jenkins
Captain Bluntschli
Jose Joaquin Perez
Catherine Petkoff
Beth Ritson
Nicola
Lee Spencer

Creative Team

Director
Preston Lane
Scenic Designer
Howard C. Jones
Costume Designer
Bill Brewer
Lighting Designer
Norman Coates
Sound Designer
Palmer Hefferan
Dramaturg
Bryan Conger
Resident Movement Coach
Denise Gabriel
Resident Vocal Coach
Resident Fight Choreographer
Jim Wren
Casting Director
Cindi Rush
Stage Manager
Emily J. Mails
InSight Speaker
John Poole

Photos Arms and the Man

Videos Arms and the Man

News & Reviews Arms and the Man

Reviews:

A century later, ‘Arms and the Man’ still dazzles audiences
The Carolinian
September 29, 2016

 Triad Stage’s production of “Arms and the Man” by George Bernard Shaw has been up and running since September 11, and I finally got the chance to go see it. This was my first live theater production in quite some time, so I went in with hoping to be impressed, and did not come out disappointed. The play itself was a pure delight, as one could only expect from a Bernard Shaw comedy. Even though it was written over a hundred years ago, “Arms and the Man’s”critique of its character’s empty values and romanticized view of war are still relevant themes today’s culture. Director Preston Lane succeeded in producing a show that is clever, charming, and highly entertaining.

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Reviews:

Theater review: Triad Stage presents 'Arms and the Man'
News & Record
September 18, 2016

 What better way to mark the opening of Triad Stage’s 16th season than with a collaboration with UNC-Greensboro and ArtsGreensboro and a play by one of the world’s most influential dramatists. Triad Stage has woven itself into the unique and multilayered tapestry of Greensboro over the past 15 years, and the city, its schools, organizations and residents are better for it. Preston Lane directs “Arms and the Man,” George Bernard Shaw’s commentary on war and love, to complement UNCG’s extensive community effort, “War & Peace Imagined,” designed to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I.

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News:

Triad Stage brings George Bernard Shaw’s tale of Love and War, “Arms and the Man,” to life
News & Record
September 9, 2016

 There have been two constant, universal themes for writers since the dawn of the written word: love and war. And Triad Stage will tackle those themes to open its 2016-17 season by presenting George Bernard Shaw’s “Arms and the Man.” The play starts Sept. 11, and is part of both ArtsGreensboro’s 17 Days Arts & Culture Festival and UNC-Greensboro’s War and Peace Series.

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News:

Arms and the Man opens on Triad Stage
The Carolinian
September 7, 2016

 As part of Arts Greensboro’s 17 DAYS Arts & Culture Festival, and UNCG’s War & Peace Series, Triad Stage presents George Bernard Shaw’s “Arms and the Man”. One of Shaw’s wittiest dramas will be brought to life by Greensboro’s most accoladed theater this fall. “Arms and the Man” is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw that illustrates the ineffectiveness of war and the hypocrisies of human nature.

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